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yay for finding a new hilarious stand-up comedian!

The amount of scenes that it looks like they actually shot in SF <3

AND THAT SONG IS BY MILO GREENE <3

See You Leave by RJD2 from the album: More Is Than Isn't

m3ia:

RJD2, “See You Leave”

poolfullofjello:

i-cant-believe-its-not-chicken:

i-cant-believe-its-not-chicken

Its decided my life goal is now to star in an infomercial 

How do white people survive?

sweartothisshit:

If you ever get the chance to see your favourite band live, fucking do it and don’t regret a single thing.

princessreason:

google maps has an option for driving and walking biking and public transport but it has no option for running or even crab walking or heelying or razor scootering or segwaying. i’m not saying these things are necessary, i’m just saying there’s room for improvement

fohk:

“We accept the reality of the world with which we are presented”
The Truman Show (1998)Peter Weir

fohk:

We accept the reality of the world with which we are presented”

The Truman Show (1998)
Peter Weir

thecraftychemist:

sciencealert:

Teenager from India invents device that can convert breath to speech: http://bit.ly/1m7yTBo

This is amazing:

Sixteen-year-old Arsh Shah Dilbagi has developed a new technology called ‘TALK’, which is a cheap and portable device to help people who are physically incapable of speaking express themselves. Right now, 1.4 percent of the world’s population has very limited or no speech, due to conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), locked-in syndrome (LIS), Encephalopathy (SEM), Parkinson’s disease, and paralysis. So that’s literally a group of people that could match the entire population of Germany, and all of them unable to speak.
Stephen Hawking has a device to help him communicate, but it’s extremely expensive, costing several thousand dollars, and is also quite bulky. What Dilbagi has managed to do is invent a device that achieves the same thing, but can be purchased for just $80.
The way TALK works is that it’s able to translate the user’s breath into electric signals using a special device called a MEMS Microphone. This technology is composed of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm etched directly into a silicon chip, and an amplifying device to increase the sound of the user’s breath.
By expelling two types of breaths into the device, with different intensities and timing, the user is able to spell out words in Morse code. “A microprocessor then interprets the breathes into dots and dashes, converting them into words. The words are then sent to a second microprocessor that synthesises them into voice,” says Whitney Mallett at Motherboard. “The morse code can either be translated into English, or specific commands and phrases. The device features nine different voices varying in age and gender.”

thecraftychemist:

sciencealert:

Teenager from India invents device that can convert breath to speech: http://bit.ly/1m7yTBo

This is amazing:

Sixteen-year-old Arsh Shah Dilbagi has developed a new technology called ‘TALK’, which is a cheap and portable device to help people who are physically incapable of speaking express themselves. Right now, 1.4 percent of the world’s population has very limited or no speech, due to conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), locked-in syndrome (LIS), Encephalopathy (SEM), Parkinson’s disease, and paralysis. So that’s literally a group of people that could match the entire population of Germany, and all of them unable to speak.

Stephen Hawking has a device to help him communicate, but it’s extremely expensive, costing several thousand dollars, and is also quite bulky. What Dilbagi has managed to do is invent a device that achieves the same thing, but can be purchased for just $80.

The way TALK works is that it’s able to translate the user’s breath into electric signals using a special device called a MEMS Microphone. This technology is composed of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm etched directly into a silicon chip, and an amplifying device to increase the sound of the user’s breath.

By expelling two types of breaths into the device, with different intensities and timing, the user is able to spell out words in Morse code. “A microprocessor then interprets the breathes into dots and dashes, converting them into words. The words are then sent to a second microprocessor that synthesises them into voice,” says Whitney Mallett at Motherboard. “The morse code can either be translated into English, or specific commands and phrases. The device features nine different voices varying in age and gender.”

trinandtonic:

dontbearuiner:

lawebloca:

Friends

This is a very important post.

babies babying together

10 random songs from my iTunes library

Holy Ground, Taylor Swift, Red

Bye, J Dilla, Donuts

The Dream Has Faded, Geographer, Myth

Touch, Natasha Bedingfield, Strip Me

Shuffle A Dream, Little Dragon, Ritual Union

Long Gone, Kenna, Long Gone - Single

Tee-Pees 1-12

Listen to Your Heart (Furious F. EZ Radio Edit), D.H.T. Featuring Edmee, Listen to Your Heart

Even If It Breaks Your Heart, Eli Young Band, Life At Best

Stick to the Status Quo, High School Musical